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Abandoned Sanatorium de la Foret, France

Viktoriia Makeenko
 Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com
Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Sanatorium: At the end of the 19th century in France, a committee was formed to study measures designed to detect, treat, and prevent the spread of tuberculosis. The committee included hospital doctors, members of the Paris Municipal Council, and the Supervisory Board for Public Assistance.

Ultimately, a decision was made that seriously ill patients should be placed somewhere away from the main city general hospitals.

In 1894, a construction project was planned which included the technical facilities of a sanatorium for tuberculosis patients. Construction began on July 13, according to historical data.

Construction of the Sanatorium da la Foret cost 1,600,000 francs, and the hospital covered an area of 336,000 square meters (401,852 square yards).

The opening of the first building took place in August 1900. However, construction of the whole wasn’t finally completed until October. Its initial capacity was 164 beds. Please do check out Frank’s Facebook page and website 

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

World War I

The project required that separate buildings for men and women should be built. The overall capacity was to be 250 beds spread between these houses. However, due to the events of World War I from 1914-1918, the construction of the second building was completed only in 1928. The total maximum capacity of the sanatorium was 320 beds.

Before World War I, the sanatorium accommodated patients with tuberculosis. During the war, the sanatorium received soldiers from the barracks, having relocated all other patients before that.

After 1920, the institution re-opened to civilians. However, the sanatorium was reserved for the treatment of women only. In 1931, the complex added housing for medical personnel.

World War II

After the construction of the second building of the sanatorium, World War II began. Patients were evacuated after the bombing on May 19, 1940. The sanitorium re-opened its doors three months later, once again to soldiers. Only in 1949, after the end of the war, did the last soldier leave the institution.

In 1952, the sanatorium was refurbished and dedicated to gerontology. Its capacity increased to 700 beds. In 1998, the maximum number of occupied beds was 247.

During the 80s, the sanatorium was modernized; electrical installations and elevators were improved. A carpentry workshop for patients was also installed, as well as the equipment needed for them to play music and chess.

Closure

In 1997, the committee reviewed its decision and concluded that the sanatorium should be closed. Since 1998, it has been abandoned. Currently, there are no plans to reuse the building, and the site is under constant guard with alarms installed.

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Auhtor: Vincent Jansen | www.hoorayfordecay.com

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

Author: Frank Messmer | Facebook @Monodio.de

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